Category Archives: Interior garden

Tenju-an 067

Tenju-an 067

Tenju-an
Buddhist Sub-temple
bit.ly/tenjuan-wiki
Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto
Nov. 18, 2013

Producer : Kokan Shiren
bit.ly/kokanshiren-wiki
1339
Restoration : Hosokawa Yusai (Hosokawa Fujitaka)
bit.ly/hosokawayusai-wiki
1602

Posted by yagitakashi on 2014-01-26 14:38:44

Tagged: , Religious Space , Historic Site , Garden , Landscape Design , Interior Design , Kyoto

Jardins de Métis (Reford Gardens) 2012

Jardins de Métis (Reford Gardens) 2012

The Canada Council Art Bank has created an exciting intervention at les Jardins de Métis (Reford Gardens) on Québec’s south shore. The Reford family portraits are on display in the formal gallery space and contemporary portraits by leading Canadian artists grace the walls in the main rooms of the Estevan Lodge.

www.artbank.ca

La Banque d’œuvres d’art du Conseil des arts du Canada a organisé une intervention stimulante aux Jardins de Métis (Reford Gardens) sur la Rive-Sud du Québec. On a suspendu les portraits historiques de la famille Reford dans la galerie officielle alors que des portraits contemporains, créés par des artistes canadiens réputés, sont exposés dans les principales pièces de la Villa Estevan.

www.banquedart.ca

Posted by Art Bank / Banque d’oeuvres d’art on 2012-06-28 18:37:05

Tagged: , art , fine art , visual arts , contemporary art , Canadian contemporary art , art rental , Canada Council for the Arts , Canada , Ottawa , office , boardroom , business , government , interior design , print , painting , photography , sculpture , installation , museum , gallery , beaux-arts , arts visuels , art contemporain , art contemporain canadien , location d’œuvres d’art , Conseil des arts du Canada , bureau , salle de conférence , entreprise , gouvernement , design intérieur , estampe , peinture , tableau , photographie , musée , galerie

Private Suitable Study Room Interior Design

Private Suitable Study Room Interior Design

Thank you for visiting , Private Suitable Study Room Interior Design, we hope you can find what you need here. Just for your information, Private Suitable Study Room Interior Design located in Interior Design category and this post was created on 25 March, 2014. If you have any comments, concerns or issues please let us know. Don’t forget to share this picture with others via Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest or other social medias! we do hope you’ll get inspired by , Private Suitable Study Room Interior Design! Thanks again!

Posted by anisukesi on 2014-05-11 14:27:21

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Howies-Homestay-15-1

Howies-Homestay-15-1

Posted by Dmitriy Kruglyak on 2015-01-11 08:34:24

Tagged: , Dream Home, For Sale, Interior Design, Resort Residence, Selected Work, Bedroom, Bensley Architects, Chieng Mai, Landscaping, Living Room, Swimming Pool, Thailand, Water Gardens

Bowood 10

Bowood 10

Bowood is a grade I listed Georgian country house with interiors by Robert Adam and a garden designed by Lancelot "Capability" Brown.

Posted by Christopher Rodgers on 2014-05-25 17:37:06

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UrbaneApts / Exterior / Fairmont

UrbaneApts / Exterior / Fairmont

Urbane on Fairmont
UrbaneLobby.com
UrbaneBlog.com
BY: KENNY CORBIN

Posted by urbaneapts on 2009-01-10 02:12:11

Tagged: , Urbane , Apartments , Michigan , troy , Berkley , Royal , oak , Clawson , Lofts , Lifestyle , Apts , Go , green , Save , energy , Ikea , Design , urban , living , loft , style , studio , space , luxurious , residential , communities , renewal , units , interior , exterior , detroit , model , bedroom , kitchen , room , crash , pad , bathroom , carpet , couch , modern , luxury , furniture , designed , fabrics , colour , decorative , contemporary , simplicity , elegance , décor , sofas , stylish , architectural

Sissinghurst Castle

Sissinghurst Castle

History
Sissinghurst’s garden was created in the 1930s by Vita Sackville-West, poet and gardening writer, and her husband Harold Nicolson, author and diplomat.[2] Sackville-West was a writer on the fringes of the Bloomsbury Group who found her greatest popularity in the weekly columns she contributed as gardening correspondent of The Observer, which incidentally—for she never touted it—made her own garden famous.[3] The garden itself is designed as a series of ‘rooms’, each with a different character of colour and/or theme, the walls being high clipped hedges and many pink brick walls.[4] The rooms and ‘doors’ are so arranged that, as one enjoys the beauty in a given room, one suddenly discovers a new vista into another part of the garden, making a walk a series of discoveries that keeps leading one into yet another area of the garden.[5] Nicolson spent his efforts coming up with interesting new interconnections, while Sackville-West focused on making the flowers in the interior of each room exciting.

For Sackville-West, Sissinghurst and its garden rooms came to be a poignant and romantic substitute for Knole,[6] reputedly the largest house in Britain, which as the only child of Lionel, the 3rd Lord Sackville she would have inherited had she been a male, but which had passed to her cousin as the male heir.

The site is ancient; "hurst" is the Saxon term for an enclosed wood. A manor house with a three-armed moat was built here in the Middle Ages. In 1305, King Edward I spent a night here. It was long thought that in 1490 Thomas Baker, a man from Cranbrook, purchased Sissinghurst, although there is no evidence for it.[7] What is certain is that the house was given a new brick gatehouse in the 1530s by Sir John Baker, one of Henry VIII’s Privy Councillors, and greatly enlarged in the 1560s by his son Sir Richard Baker, when it became the centre of a 700-acre (2.8 km2) deer park. In August 1573 Queen Elizabeth I spent three nights at Sissinghurst.[7]

Rose arbour in Sissinghurst’s White Garden room, which set a fashion for ‘white gardens'[8]
After the collapse of the Baker family in the late 17th century, the building had many uses: as a prisoner-of-war camp during the Seven Years’ War; as the workhouse for the Cranbrook Union; after which it became homes for farm labourers.

Sackville-West and Nicolson found Sissinghurst in 1930 after concern that their property Long Barn, near Sevenoaks, Kent, was close to development over which they had no control. Although Sissinghurst was derelict, they purchased the ruins and the farm around it and began constructing the garden we know today.[6] The layout by Nicolson and planting by Sackville-West were both strongly influenced by the gardens of Gertrude Jekyll and Edwin Lutyens; by the earlier Cothay Manor in Somerset, laid out by Nicolson’s friend Reginald Cooper, and described by one garden writer as the "Sissinghurst of the West Country";[9] and by Hidcote Manor Garden, designed and owned by Lawrence Johnston, which Sackville-West helped to preserve. Sissinghurst was first opened to the public in 1938.wikipedia

Posted by tedesco57 on 2017-07-18 16:20:43

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Blenheim Palace and Gardens

Blenheim Palace and Gardens

We spent a wonderful day here in early July. Blenheim Palace makes a relatively easy day trip or even half-day trip from Oxford, with frequent public buses to Woodstock stopping right at the gates. We only saw a fraction of the vast parkland and gardens. The tour of the palace itself was well done and very informative.

The full Wikipedia entry is very well done: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blenheim_Palace

Here is a quote from the introduction:

Blenheim Palace is a large and monumental country house situated in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England. It is the only non-episcopal country house in England to hold the title "palace". The Palace, one of England’s largest houses, was built between 1705 and circa 1724. It was recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.
Its construction was originally intended to be a gift to John Churchill, the 1st Duke of Marlborough from a grateful nation in return for military triumph against the French and Bavarians. However, it soon became the subject of political infighting, which led to Marlborough’s exile, the fall from power of his Duchess, and irreparable damage to the reputation of the architect Sir John Vanbrugh. Designed in the rare, and short-lived, English baroque style, architectural appreciation of the palace is as divided today as it was in the 1720s.[1] It is unique in its combined usage as a family home, mausoleum and national monument. The palace is also notable as the birthplace and ancestral home of Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill.
The plaque above the massive East gate gives a sanitised history of the palace’s construction, reading:
"Under the auspices of a munificent sovereign this house was built for John Duke of Marlborough and his Duchess Sarah, by Sir J Vanbrugh between the years 1705 and 1722. And the Royal Manor of Woodstock, together with a grant of £240,000 towards the building of Blenheim, was given by Her Majesty Queen Anne and confirmed by act of Parliament."
The truth is that the building of the palace was a minefield of political intrigue, with scheming on a Machiavellian scale by Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough. Following the palace’s completion, it has been the home of the Churchill family for the last 300 years, and various members of the family have in that period wrought various changes, in the interiors, park and gardens, some for the better, others for the worse. At the end of the 19th century, the palace and the Churchills were saved from ruin by an American marriage. Thus, the exterior of the palace remains in good repair and exactly as completed.

Posted by UGArdener on 2008-09-13 10:23:31

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